Breakfast in Garden

Posts Tagged ‘local foods’

Pinehurst Inn Breakfast: Celebrating Summer Harvests in Cold of Winter

January 24th, 2014 by Nancy Sandstrom

white bowl with overflowing blueberries and a partially slices loaf of sour dough bread.As we prepared our Pinehurst Inn breakfast this morning, I was struck by the beautiful color of the blueberries pulled out of the freezer. Every time I look at these deep blue jewels, I am filled with joy. Please understand…..I am a blueberry junkie. I have been known to put blueberries on many food items ranging from pork chops to eggs.

That being said, there are those tried and true recipes that simply always work. For inns, they become expected fare by returning guests. So this morning, when we gave the menu to our guests,  they lit up with a smile. Even though they were new guests for us, they had been referred by some of our frequent guests who mentioned our Blueberry Cream Cheese French Toast. They knew they were getting the true Pinehurst Inn Breakfast.

We try very hard to incorporate locally grown / produced ingredients into all our recipes. This time of year, clearly we are working with what’s in the freezer or available this time of year. In the case of Blueberry Cream Cheese French Toast (recipe below), this is relatively easy.

  • The Bayfield blueberries in our freezer are a part of the approximately 150# that we’ve stashed away to last through the winter. Hats, scaves and mittens off to Highland Valley Farm – the Dale family knows how to grow berries. They are one of a number of terrific Bayfield orchards.
  • The cream cheese in this case was “home made”, the leave-behind on my most recent production of whey (yes, the whey is another very cool story at another time).
  • The bread come from Ashland Baking Company, after our weekly visit to pick up the freshly baked, round sour dough loaves (the aroma in the car on these pick up days is wonderful!).
  • The eggs recently are coming from Chequamegon Food Co-op who does a great job of sourcing local egg people during a tough time of year (so, would you lay eggs when it is 15 below?).
  • The syrup comes from Wisconsin Maid Sugar Bush out of Park Falls. This golden syrup arrives by the gallon, hand delivered by the very folks who tap the trees, boil it down and bottle it. Lovely.

In other words, this recipe is built from hard work, tender care, heart & soul with a touch of joy added in. And as we prepare it, we know that it is something guests will enjoy. It’s a win-win.

So are you wondering about a recipe? Of course. We share happily below. All we ask is that you take some thought about where you are sourcing your ingredients. Making those right decisions definitely enhances the flavor and adds that last ingredient we all need…..a bit of true joy.

Pinehurst Inn Blueberry Oven French Toast

Green Gab from Pinehurst Inn – Find Your Area CSA

January 16th, 2014 by Nancy Sandstrom

Variety of fresh produce including radishes, peppers,carrots and potatoesWe just completed our annual sign up for one of a number of area CSAs – Community Supported Agriculture. We are very blessed to live in a region that offers great options on organized, bundled weekly or biweekly boxed of fresh, local produce and food products. Picking up these boxes of foodie treasures makes me giddy as I drive home dreaming up some of the many ways we can incorporate these delicious ingredients into our meals and those meals we provide our guests. Similarly our treks in the summer and fall up to the Bayfield Orchards brings joy whether picked raspberries, blueberries or apples – all coming from the fields and trees of our good friends and neighbors.

What is a CSA?  From Wikipedia:   “Community-supported agriculture (CSA; sometimes known as community-shared agriculture) is an alternative, locally-based economic model of agriculture and food distribution. A CSA also refers to a particular network or association of individuals who have pledged to support one or more local farms, with growers and consumers sharing the risks and benefits of food production. CSA members or subscribers pay at the onset of the growing season for a share of the anticipated harvest; once harvesting begins, they receive weekly shares of vegetables and fruit, in a vegetable box scheme. Many CSAs also sometimes include herbs, cut flowers, honey, eggs, dairy products and meat. In theory a CSA can provide any product to its members, although the majority of CSA tend to provide produce and other comestibles. Some CSAs provide for contributions of labor in lieu of a portion of subscription costs.”

We suggest a checking out Local Harvest for more information on the benefits of patronizing CSA’s.

Our decision to support our local farmers and producers comes from both a desire to support our local economy (agritourism is a big deal in the Chequeamegon Bay!). But our own health and quality of food prepared in our kitchen is equally as important. We know the growers & producers. We’ve seen many of their operations. We have confidence that we are getting some of the healthiest and highest quality produce and products we can. The decision is heart-felt driven by our desire to build a business based on Sustainable Tourism.

Looking to find CSA’s in your area. You will find a great search function at Local Harvest as well as a ton of additional information.

photo credit: Photo from Acorn Creek Farm, Tomah, WI

 

It’s the berries! (in Bayfield!)

June 12th, 2012 by kristensandstrom

Well, everything truly does seem to be happening a bit earlier this year. We have just heard that the strawberries are just about ready at the local berry farms. Right now Erickson’s Orchard & Country Store has a limited quantity of ready-picked strawberries available for purchase. This is about two weeks ahead of schedule, but we certainly don’t mind. There is something so especially delicious about eating fruit that was just picked locally!

We talk about cooking with local foods all the time, and how easy it is. We’d like to utilize our blog a bit more to share with you ideas to help you do more in your own kitchens. We make it a point to buy as many fresh local berries as we can while they are in season. We have a couple of extra freezers to store these scrumptious treats year round. Berries are actually quite easy to freeze, but how you do it really does make a difference in how long they will last.

We are quite lucky at Pinehurst that my father (Steve) loves the process of cleaning and cutting berries for freezing. He also does this with potatoes, peppers and other produce. He finds it quite relaxing and reminds him of his childhood. This is a good thing as I don’t think the women in our family feel quite that way about it. Here’s a link to some very simple and good instructions on freezing strawberries: http://www.pickyourown.org/strawberries_freezing.htm. The most important step of this process is draining the cleaned berries of as much moisture as possible.

So, what can you do with these berries? Of course, the very best part about buying local berries is picking them directly from the flats and eating them! But, alas we can’t always do that. Here are two recipes that we serve quite frequently at Pinehurst Inn:

Strawberry Parfait:
This is a really easy one: Take some fresh Bayfield strawberries, and quarter them. Then take some plain yogurt and add a touch of maple syrup and vanilla extract (just enough to flavor as you like). Layer the strawberries and yogurt with your favorite granola and enjoy!

Strawberry (or any berry) Muffins:

Ingredients:

1

Herb gardens begin as Spring blooms in Bayfield!

May 29th, 2012 by Nancy Sandstrom

silver sage farm and flowers image Yesterday Kristen and I took a trip to Silver Sage Farm to purchase herbs for the Pinehurst Inn gardens. This beautiful farm is located in Port Wing, WI, about 30 minutes from Bayfield. While it is a bit of a trek, it is completely worth it. Owner, Mary Pearson, has her own little piece of paradise. Upon arrival the first thing we noticed was the amazing gardens right outside of Mary’s home. Wine grapes, lettuces, flowers and so much more! The bees and butterflies were very very happy.

This is one of the things about living up here that is hard to explain to those who have been acclimated to the city to the extent that they buy their herbs at the grocery store or a discount store. There is something so much fun about going to the actual farm and talking to the gardener about their plants. They really do treat them like a family. Calling plants sad because they haven’t been transplanted yet. Mary was eager to tour me through her garden to share the different varieties of herbs she has.

 

herbs from silver sage farm imageWe found a beautiful selection of rosemary, thyme, basil, parley, peppers and more. Even a few things we hadn’t heard of. Lemon Basil? Orange Thyme? Mary was a wealth of information and was able to suggest a few different varieties of peppers that will do better in our region. The smells were amazing and we simply can’t wait to get these in the ground so they can flourish and be added to you breakfast when you come to visit us.

Now we just need mother nature to cooperate a bit more and give us the time to get these beautiful plants in the ground before the next thunderstorms roll in.

 

Finally, one of our favorite parts about visiting Silver Sage Farm that we weren’t expecting were her gorgeous horses greeting us! We couldn’t help but take a few photos!

silver sage farm horse image

Pinehurst Inn – “Bringing Soul to our Breakfasts”

April 29th, 2012 by Nancy Sandstrom

As I was doing my normal wandering through a number of sustainable food-related blogs this morning, I came upon a blog written by Terra Wellington on The Buzz – Fresh News, Musings and Insights from Stoneyfield Farm. In “How to Bring Soul to Your Food” Terra relates beautifully how food is her connection to history, memories and community. Sharing this blog post is a joy as it conveys so well a philosophy behind how Steve and I attempt to build our breakfast (as well as many of our own meals) here at Pinehurst Inn.

The sourcing and discovery of new and locally grown ingredients is such an adventure. The incorporation of new discoveries not only elicits memories from years past, but also connects us to both nature and local Bayfield area growers in a way that adds incredible richness to the process. Bringing a yummy breakfast to the guests’ table is a primary goal. Yet we’d like to take that a bit deeper. If they want to know, we share where that food came from and some of the stories behind it – the people, the place, the natural history.

Yesterday Steve and our 4-year-old grandson, Aidyn trekked down to Pikes Creek just below Pinehurst Inn. Aidyn had just purchased a periscope and it was time to do some exploring. During this trek, they came upon a wonderful stash of fiddlehead ferns and wild leeks (ramps). After more adventure seeking, a few small bags of these incredible greens landed in the kitchen. An opportunity for research and some cooking. Steve created a wonderful tart with an Almond Flour Crust, mixture of fiddlehead ferns and wild leeks, parmesan cheese. Yum. An incredible dinner.

As we ate, he also shared the natural story – only found in the early spring in wet brackish forests. Each spring when the snow melts, the ferns push their way up through the forest floor, uncurling slowly. It’s at this moment just before they uncurl that they are harvested. Tender and with a taste that is reminiscent of a cross between a green bean and asparagus. How blessed we are that these short lived treats are right outside our door, creating a new seasonal food tradition.

And yes, we went ahead and created another tart for breakfast for our guests. They were happy and loved sharing similar food stories.

So over the coming months, periodically we will post some of the ways we attempt to bring “soul to our breakfasts”. How about you? Do you try to bring soul to your food?

Pinehurst Inn Featured in Edible Madison – Celebrating Local Foods

March 23rd, 2012 by Nancy Sandstrom

One of the best things about running this type of business is having those little snipets of recognition through articles and mentions. This week saw the fruits of an article in Edible Madison written by Jessica Luhning. Jessica and photographer, Jim Klousia stayed here at Pinehurst Inn in Bayfield this past January. They had arranged to come with the hopes of an article that focused on our local foods philosophy along as well as that of Good Thyme Restaurant. We had a great time with these two, and are so pleased to share the resulting article, Authentic Bayfield Peninsula.

As I read this piece for the first time, I kept thinking, “Ah, she got it!” Jessica has been successful in conveying not only our philosophy, but also that of the Bayfield, Wisconsin region. We are a buy local mecca! Over the past few years, we’ve worked hard to source terrific local growers, producers, service providers and more. Whether we are talking eggs or paint, bacon or toilet paper, we consistently work to find either a local entity that produces the product or is able to source it for us. Jessica understood and honored this in the article.

Here is the exciting part of our story. What we are hearing more and more from our guests is that our local foods and purchasing efforts are really one of the features of our business they find the most appealing. So cool — we can enhance their Pinehurst Inn experience by supporting the local economy. Of course along with the good eats come the stories behind the food. The multi-generational work by the Dale family at Highland Valley Farm. The start-up goat cheese produced by a wonderful goat farmer in Cornicopia, Sassy Nanny Cheese. The weekly deliver of eggs from Angel Acres Farm when we hear the trials and tribulations of egg farming. Or Tom Galazen’s North Wind Farm that grows some of the best berries ever – Tom’s our favorite resident hippie living off the grid with an incredible knowledge of farming. This is just a tinny “taste” of our local foods community.

Of course we always invite folks to come on up to Pinehurst Inn, enjoy our breakfast offerings and connected stories, as well at all that this area has to offer. But in the meantime, check out what’s available in your own area. To get you started, check out the Local Harvest website – Farmer’s Markets and CSA’s from all over the country are simply waiting to connect.

 

Catered Dinner at Pinehurst Inn – just one ingredient in the Bayfield & Pinehurst mix

February 1st, 2012 by Nancy Sandstrom

This past weekend we had a wonderful group of guests traveling together. Long time friends, making the opportunity to come to Bayfield and Pinehurst Inn, enjoy each other’s company in a relaxed setting. This group was such fun and are a great example of maximizing the Pinehurst Inn and Bayfield experience.

Their activities were right in line with how to do Bayfield in the winter. Arrival at Pinehurst to order a pizza from Maggies and sit in the parlor by the fire talk, laughing and just kicking back. Saturday morning shopping. finding great opportunities to get to know Bayfield through the eyes of a couple of fun business owners. A Wolfsong Dog Sledding adventure that they will remember for a lifetime. And a catered dinner served by Molly Lewis Siegler where great food provided more opportunity to celebrate.

It isn’t about programming every minute. It’s about truly experiencing the place for what it has to offer. This group will remember the weekend for years to come. And they truly made connecting adventure, environment and personal rejuvenation their goal. All to the backdrop of Pinehurst Inn and this small community of Bayfield, Wisconsin. And as innkeepers, we watch this and it really makes our day. Thank you!

Calling all Cooks! Pinehurst wants your recipes!

November 17th, 2010 by Nancy Sandstrom

Pinehurst Inn Apple Cheddar MuffinsAre you a foodie? Do you love to cook and play with recipes? Do you get excited at the prospect of finding some great produce at your local Farmers Market? We’d love to connect!

Pinehurst Inn is seeking your help in expanding our breakfast offerings. We work hard to offer our guests wonderful breakfasts each morning with recipes that honor our local produce and products, provides options for various dietary needs and is simply good food. But it’s time for some fresh (no pun intended) recipes!

Send us your best recipe that might work for breakfast by January 15, 2011. We will select the top 5. These recipes will then be offered for breakfast to our guests through February 28, 2011 with the guests rating the recipes on a “1-5 muffin scale.” These overall ratings will be used to determine the winner.

The winner will receive three of the best Wisconsin Bed and Breakfast cookbooks along with a $50 Pinehurst Inn Gift Certificate.

Some suggested parameters:

The Quieter Season has Begun

October 20th, 2010 by Nancy Sandstrom

Well, it’s no secret. Things do tend to quiet down a bit here in Bayfield once Apple Festival is over and the fall colors begin to quiet down. It’s true. There is something special about this time of year though as well. There is something so incredibly cool about the sounds of the northeast winds blowing through the towering pines around this old house. The waters have begun to cool, but they have a certain sparkle at this time of year – no idea why, but these waters sure do twinkle at us when it’s sunny. Speaking of sunny, that is certainly something that we have had plenty of this harvest season. The weather has been amazing, and looking at the extended forecast we’re in for more! This is ideal hiking weather, and when you get that chill from the cool breezes, come inside, read your book by the fireplace and enjoy a delicious cup of tea.

While there may not be as many water activities to participate in at this time of year, there is still plenty to keep one occupied. There are still plenty of shops open, restaurants to dine at and of course trails to hike. Please contact us if you’d like more information on things to do at this time of year. Of course, we’d be remiss if we didn’t mention that we have some great specials running right now! If you stay with us during the midweek (Sun-Thur) you can get as much as 25% off your third night, or come in November and don’t miss out on the “Two for $222″ special.

Finally, this is a particularly nice time of year for baking! There’s nothing quite like the smell of fresh bakery warming you after a long cool hike. We have been sampling some newer recipes this year, and I think that this is one of our bigger successes:

Caramelized Apple Bread Pudding
Serves 8

Ingredients:
Apple filling:
4 Dudley apples, cubed (or any firm, tart baking apple)
1 stick butter (1/2 cup)
3/4 cup brown sugar
2 tsp cinnamon

Bread Pudding:
1 tsp nutmeg
1 loaf french bread (or any bread you prefer)
8 large eggs
1 cup half-n-half
2 cups buttermilk
2 tablespoons sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/4 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp nutmeg
dash salt

Topping:
about 1 cup rolled oats
about 1 cup pecans (or nuts of your choice) chopped
left over liquids from apples

1. Slice and cube bread and place in 9×13″ baking dish (spray pan, or use parchment paper)
2. Melt butter in large frying pan, add brown sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg – add apples to mixture and saute for a couple of minutes – careful not to over cook the apples (keep them firm)
3. Using a slotted spoon spread the apples over the bread cubes. Reserve butter mixture.
4. In a large bowl mix the eggs, milks, sugar, extract, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt – whisk well and pour evenly over bread and apples. There should be enough liquid to almost cover the bread.
5. Cover with foil and let rest in the fridge overnight.
6. Take the reserved butter & brown sugar mixture and mix with rolled oats and pecans – you’re looking for a pretty “goopy” consistency here.
7. Preheat oven to 350 degrees
8. Before putting in the oven, spread the topping over the bread and apples, and bake for 45-60 minutes.
9. Let rest for 10 minutes or so before serving to let the custard set.

Serve & Enjoy!

Pinehurst Inn loves the WBBA Microbrewery Map

September 8th, 2010 by Nancy Sandstrom

Pinehurst Inn loves all the great ways WBBA (Wisconsin Bed & Breakfast Association) promotes Wisconsin. The latest addition to their website is the Wisconsin Microbreweries Map providing opportunity for a great tour around Wisconsin enjoying these artisan brews.

Of course the Chequamegon Bay area is proud to have the northern-most 08-mar-31brewery recognized: South Shore Brewery which is connected with Deep Water Grille located in Ashland, just 25 miles south of Bayfield.

South Shore is known for their flavorful and innovative products. On tap, there’s usually always a Cream Ale, Honey Pils, Nut Brown Ale and Stout. Seasonal beers rotate between
Red Lager, Mai Bock, Bavarian Wheat, Applefest Ale, Bracket
and Porter.

Word has it that the Applefest Brew went into the fermenter about a week ago! This annual favorite is anticipated by locals and visitors.

It is also great to share that South Shore Brewery and their affiliate restaurant Deep Water Grille are actively involved as a local “Green Team” working to create more sustainable and green operations within their business.

So enjoy the microbreweries all around this great state – but be sure to come north! We look forward to seeing you.

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